Archive for Lollapalooza

The Many Faces Of Metallica : 1996 Kirk Hammet

Posted in music, photography, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on February 4, 2009 by Kevin Estrada

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Metallica
Lollapalooza ’96
Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre
Laguna Hills, CA
August 4, 1996

To put things lightly – a lot had changed.  Metallica were now a corporate giant and were pulling in big enough numbers to headline the once-alternative Lollapalooza Tour. Load had just been released not too long before this gig and it was the first time they rolled through town in support of the new CD.  I had seen a handful of photos showcasing Metallica’s new image.  To be honest, I thought it was some sort of joke or publicity stunt, or at least something that wouldn’t last.

As Metallica took the stage that summer evening, I stood there – stunned.  I couldn’t believe what I was seeing through my lens.  Short hair, designer clothing, nicely trimmed facial hair, facial piercings and (it still keeps me up at night) eyeliner.  It was at this point that I realized that Metallica was no longer influencing bands…they were now being influenced.

One of my favorite moments in Metallica history was when Hettfield barked at the 1984 Donnington crowd, “If you came here to see spandex, eye makeup, and the words ‘Oh baby’ in every fuckin’ song, this ain’t the fuckin’ band.”  Now, it looked like I might be seeing that band.

Photographed with my Canon EOS-1 and a Canon f5.6 80-300mm lens.  Shot on Fujichrome film.
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Classic Reunions…Jane’s Addiction

Posted in music, photography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 11, 2008 by Kevin Estrada

Jane’s Addiction
Relapse Tour
Universal Amphitheatre
November 18, 1997

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Part three of a five-part series I am doing this week on Classic Reunions. Each day I will add a new photo of a featured artist and that band’s classic reunion.
***

Jane’s Addiction had their first major break up in 1991, right after their final famous Honolulu gig in which Perry Farrell and drummer Stephen Perkins played a couple of tunes butt naked. Sadly, they were at the height of their game in terms of recognition and creative energy. Farrell formed Porno for Pyros while Dave Navarro joined the Red Hot Chili Peppers, replacing John Frusciante who was let go for drug use. Neither RHCP with Navarro or Porno for Pyros were able to generate the raw energy of their original incarnations. In 1997 Jane’s Addiction announced the Relapse Tour, but bassist Eric Avery refused to join, and was replaced by the Chili Peppers’ Flea. Though Flea is a kick-ass player, there was a raw, dirty and dangerous punk rock edge to Avery and Jane’s never felt quite the same without him. They had also developed a flashier and more flamboyant style, and it seemed that wearing expensive designer clothing outweighed the importance of the music. Again, the music still rocked, but the dangerous edge that was synonymous with Jane’s Addiction – that sense that anything could happen at any minute – was gone.

Photographed with my Canon EOS-1 and a Canon 28mm-70mm Canon f5.6 lens. Shot on Fujichrome film.

Amazing Screams…Henry Rollins

Posted in music with tags , , , , , on June 2, 2008 by Kevin Estrada

Henry Rollins
Rollins Band
Lollapalooza ’91
Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre : Irvine, Ca
July 21, 1991

This is the first of a five part series I am doing this week that captures Amazing Screams. Each day I will add a new photo of a featured artist and their classic scream.

The thing about Henry Rollins is that he has never been a screamer. He has always been a power singer – that applies to his solo career and the Black Flag years. Rollins’ screams were more like a volcano – the pressure builds and builds and then it ferociously explodes – not into the mic – but right at the fans. This was the first ever Lollapalooza Tour and the Rollins Band was the low man on the totem pole. They were the opening act every day, usually performing in front of small crowds – the venues always filled up later as the acts got bigger and bigger. I remember capturing this shot when the Rollins’ volcano erupted. It didn’t matter that the amphitheatre was scarcely populated, Rollins was not about to let the small number of fans sit in their seats and bob their heads – he wanted them on their feet and he wanted them to rush the stage. This is Rollins in complete command of his audience. You had to respect him for this. I don’t know what Perry Farrell was thinking having the Rollins Band play at 11am – maybe it was Farrell’s way of saying, “Wake up, it’s time to rock.”

Photographed on my old Canon F1 and a cheap, no name 70mm-210mm f5.6 lens. Shot on Kodak Ektachrome film.