Archive for Palladium

Beat On The Brat With A Photo Pass…Oh Yeah!

Posted in music, photography with tags , , , , , , , , , , on July 18, 2008 by Kevin Estrada

The Ramones
Hollywood Palladium
June 2, 1989

This was a big night for me. It was a new beginning, bringing an end to duct tape and cameras stuck on my back as I entered a concert. This was the night that I had my first official/legit photo pass to shoot a huge, legendary band. I knew that night that I would never have to smuggle my camera into a show again.

I had received a number of photo passes previous to The Ramones, but none of those bands had the history or status that came with The Ramones. The closest I had come was Jane’s Addiction, but even that pass was not meant for me (that story coming soon). This was The Ramones, the band that arguably created the Punk Rock Movement. Saying that I was excited to shoot this show is a huge understatement.

I cherished every moment in that barricade that night at the Palladium. I felt like I was floating as I snapped away – it was completely euphoric. Marky had recently rejoined and the band was on fire again. Joey was going through a heavy Metallica stage at the time, he told me how he couldn’t stop listening to In Justice For All.

This night was also a turning point for me because I befriended the band backstage after the show. To my surprise, they asked me to shoot them again the following night at their show in Long Beach.

This is the first photo I shot that night. Look at Joey – he is focused and driven. And if you look closely, he is wearing a Metallica Justice shirt – killer!

Photographed with my formerly smuggled Canon AE1 Program and a cheap, no name 70mm-210mm f5.6 lens. Shot on Kodak Ektachrome film.

Put A Cap On It

Posted in music, photography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 11, 2008 by Kevin Estrada

Limp Bizkit
Hollywood, Ca
November 15, 1997

What’s wrong with this photo? Is the color off? No, I wanted it to look that way. Is there too much contrast in the photo? No, I wanted it to look that way too. Wait…Fred Durst is not wearing a baseball cap…did he forget his hat? No, I wanted him to look that way. But it wasn’t easy.

Limp Bizkit had recently released their debut CD, Three Dollar Bill, Yall$ and the sales were off to a slow start. At the time, the band was a touring machine, and were currently main support on Primus’ The Brown Tour. Touring is what was eventually going to break Limp Bizkit and make them one of the biggest rock bands in the world.

I hooked up with the Limp guys at the Palladium in Hollywood. Time and space were tight that day, so I had to set up just a few feet away from the stage and shoot the session as Primus rolled through their soundcheck. Before we started shooting, I chatted with the band a bit so we could loosen up, get to know each other a bit. The guys were very confident, borderline cocky as they told me that they were a unique band and there was no other band like them. They went on to tell me that they wanted this photo shoot to be different than all the rest of the shoots they had been doing…for me to get creative and do something really different.

Realistically there was not much I could really do – I had a colored backdrop set up on the floor of the venue…how creative can you get? I pitched the idea of creating a different color scheme for the band, one that was over saturated and extremely contrasty – more edge and less pop. They loved the idea. But I needed something more.

I walked over to Fred and told him that he should lose the baseball cap he was wearing. He freaked out on me and told me there was no way he was doing a photo shoot without his hat. No way. I pulled Fred aside and told him that he needed to trust me. Fred was ready to walk. Then I said, “I thought you guys weren’t like all those other bands, I thought you really wanted something different…something that matched your music.” He looked me in the eye, raised an eyebrow and removed his cap.

The result was a very rare Limp Bizkit photo session, one that I truly believe is unique and not at all like the rest of the shoots the band had done prior to my shoot or even afterwards.

Photographed with my Canon EOS1, a Canon 28mm-80mm 5.6f lens, and a small Novatron strobe kit. Shot on Kodak film.